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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Decomposition-Based Assembly Synthesis Based on Structural Considerations

[+] Author and Article Information
F. A. Yetis, K. Saitou

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

J. Mech. Des 124(4), 593-601 (Nov 26, 2002) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1519276 History: Received February 01, 2000; Revised March 01, 2001; Online November 26, 2002
Copyright © 2002 by ASME
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References

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Bourjault, A., 1984, “Contribution a une Approche Méthodoligique de L’Assemblage Automatisé: Elaboration Automatique des Séquences Opératoires,” Ph.D. Thesis, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, France.
de Fazio,  T., and Whitney,  D., 1987, “Simplified Generation of All Mechanical Assembly Sequences,” IEEE J. Rob. Autom., RA-3(6), pp. 640–658. Corrections on same journal, RA-4 (6); pp. 705–708.
de Mello,  L. Hommem, and Sanderson,  A., 1991, “A Correct and Complete Algorithm for the Generation of Mechanical Assembly Sequences,” IEEE Trans. Rob. Autom., 7(2), pp. 228–240.
Lee,  S., and Shin,  Y., 1990, “Assembly Planning Based on Geometric Reasoning,” Comput. Graph., 14(2), pp. 237–250.
de Fazio,  T., Edsall,  A., Gustavson,  R., Hernandez,  J., Hutchins,  P., Leung,  H.-W., Luby,  S., Metzinger,  R., Nevins,  J., Tung,  T., and Whiteney,  D., 1993, “A Prototype of Feature-based Design for Assembly,” ASME J. Mech. Des., 115, pp. 723–734.
Lee, S., Kim, G., and Bekey, G., 1993, “Combining Assembly Planning with Redesign: An Approach for More Effective DFA,” Proceedings of 1993 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pp. 319–325.
Hsu,  W., Lee,  C., and Su,  S., 1993, “Feedback Approach to Design for Assembly by Evaluation of Assembly Plan,” Comput.-Aided Des., 25(7), pp. 395–410.
Mantripragada, R., Cunningham T., and Whitney, D., 1996, “Assembly Oriented Design: A New Approach to Designing Assemblies,” Proceedings of IFIP Workshop on Geometric Modeling and CAD, pp. 308–324, Airlie, VA.
Mantripragada, R., 1998, “Assembly Oriented Design: Concepts, Algorithms and Computational Tools,” PhD Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge.
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Michelena,  N., and Papalambros,  P., 1995, “Optimal Model-based Decomposition of Powertrain System Design,” ASME J. Mech. Des., 117(4), pp. 499–505.
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Wang, C.-H., and Bourne, D., 1997, “Concurrent Decomposition for Sheet-metal Products,” Proceedings of 1997 ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, Sacramento, CA.
Wang, C.-H., 1997, “Manufacturability-Driven Decomposition of Sheet Metal Products,” PhD thesis, Carnegie Mellon University.
Saitou, K., and Yetis, F. A., 2000, “Decomposition-Based Assembly Synthesis of Structural products: Preliminary Results,” Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Tools and Methods of Competitive Engineering Delft, The Netherlands, April 18–21, pp. 477–486.
Yetis, F. A., and Saitou, K., 2000, “Decomposition-based Assembly Synthesis Based on Structural Considerations,” Proceedings of the 2000 ASME Design Engineering Technical Conferences, Baltimore, Maryland, September 10–13, DETC2000/DAC-1428.
Yetis, F. A., 2000, “Decomposition-Based Assembly Synthesis of Structural Products,” Master’s thesis, University of Michigan.
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Result of topology extraction (a) original image, (b) dilation, (c) skeletonization, (d) initial Hough transform (shown in θ-ρ space), (e) primary line extraction, and (f ) topological segmentation
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Construction of the product topology graph: (a) extracted product topology and (b) the resulting product topology graph
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von Mises stress plot of the original bitmap image. The gray scale table on the left ranges from 183 MPa (light) to 12.3 GPa (dark). Maximum stress in the structure is approximately 500 MPa.
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Resulting decomposition of (a) the product topology graph, and (b) the structure decomposed into 3 components
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Optimization history of 3 component decomposition of the cantilever
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Resulting decomposition of (a) the product topology graph, and (b) the structure decomposed into 4 components
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Structural topology design of a bridge-like structure for maximum stiffness occupying 30% of the design domain
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Result of topology extraction (a) original image, (b) dilation, (c) skeletonization, (d) initial Hough transform (shown in θ-ρ space), (e) primary line extraction, and (f ) topological segmentation
Grahic Jump Location
Construction of the product topology graph: (a) extracted product topology and (b) the resulting product topology graph
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von Mises stress plot of the original bitmap image. The gray scale table on the left ranges from 71 MPa (light) to 11.6 GPa (dark). Maximum stress in the structure is approximately 500 MPa.
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Resulting decomposition of (a) the product topology graph, and (b) the structure decomposed into 4 components
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Resulting decomposition of (a) the product topology graph, and (b) the structure decomposed into 6 components
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Transformation of a structural topology optimization output to a product topology graph. (a) output image, (b) extraction of product topology, and (c) resulting product topology graph. The I-beam like image was adopted from 20.
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An example of product topology extraction: (a) original image, (b) dilation, (c) skeletonization, (d) initial Hough transform (shown in θ-ρ space), (e) primary line extraction, and (f) topological segmentation.
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Decomposition of a product topology graph and the corresponding product geometry (a) before decomposition and (b) after decomposition
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First half of chromosome with binary information
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Second half of chromosome with mating angle information
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Possible mating angles at the joints
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Cross-over of two chromosomes.
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Example of decomposition of an automobile body front
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Structural topology design method: The right figure shows a structure with maximum stiffness occupying 40% of the design domain. The result is obtained by using Topology Optimization Web site at the Technical University of Denmark (http://www.topopt.dtu.dk/).

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