0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Enumerating Possible Design Options for Integral Attachment Using a Hierarchical Classification Scheme

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Genc, G. A. Gabriele

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering & Mechanics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York

R. W. Messler

Department of Materials Science & Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York

P. R. Bonenberger

NAO Materials & Fastening Engineering Center, General Motors Corporation, Warren, Michigan

J. Mech. Des 119(2), 178-184 (Jun 01, 1997) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2826233 History: Received December 01, 1995; Revised February 01, 1997; Online December 11, 2007

Abstract

The proliferation of plastic in parts, and the ability to mold such parts of great complexity at little cost penalty, has resulted in the growing use of integral attachment in the form of snap-fit features in designs. Heretofore, the great diversity in geometry of mating parts and of available integral attachment snap-fit features (e.g., cantilever hooks, compression traps, bayonet-fingers, etc.) has made it appear that assembly design possibilities may be unbounded, and that attempts at optimization might be intractable. This paper enumerates all possible assembly design options using a hierarchical classification scheme. In so doing, it guides new designers and validates choices for experienced ones. The result is great order and simplicity that facilitates better understanding of this assembly joining method, better communication, development of design aids, and improved and extended attachment performance.

Copyright © 1997 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In