0
RESEARCH PAPERS

Optimum Design of a Gearbox for Low Vibration

[+] Author and Article Information
K. Inoue

Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

D. P. Townsend, J. J. Coy

National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135

J. Mech. Des 115(4), 1002-1007 (Dec 01, 1993) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2919247 History: Received September 01, 1992; Online June 02, 2008

Abstract

A computer program was developed for designing a low vibration gearbox. The code is based on a finite element shell analysis, a modal analysis, and a structural optimization method. In the finite element analysis, a triangular shell element with 18 degrees-of-freedom is used. In the optimization method, the overall vibration energy of the gearbox is used as the objective function and is minimized at the exciting frequency by varying the finite element thickness. Modal analysis is used to derive the sensitivity of the vibration energy with respect to the design variable. The sensitivity is representative of both eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The optimum value is computed by the gradient projection method and a unidimensional search procedure under the constraint condition of constant weight. The computer code is applied to a design problem derived from an experimental gearbox in use at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The top plate and two side plates of the gearbox are redesigned and the contribution of each surface to the total vibration is determined. Results show that even the optimization of the top plate alone is effective in reducing total gearbox vibration.

Copyright © 1993 by The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Design , Vibration
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In